Budapest City Guide

I recently visited Budapest for the very first time and loved everything, from the incredible architecture to the delicious food. This blog contains everything that I manged to do during my 48 hours in Hungary’s Capital, plus a list of things to do next time.

Things to know before you go

  • The local language is of course Hungarian, although many people in the capital speak good English.
  • Local currency is Hungarian Forint.
  • The airport is around 30 minutes away from the city centre.

Flights

Flights can vary in price a lot for Budapest some flights can be £40 and others £130, from my experience I found London seemed to be the cheapest to fly from. In particular Luton Airport, I discovered flights that were £25 each way, absolute bargain. I flew out from Liverpool and returned to Manchester, the flights cost me around £60 each, if you can get a similar price you have done well.

Accommodation

I booked my accommodation through Airbnb, in a beautiful, secure small apartment located on the Pest side of the city, with easy access to everything. On Airbnb you will find plenty of decent small apartments costing around £15 to £25 per night, which is excellent value for money. If you are looking for something more luxurious this can cost £50+ per night. I found hotels to be very expensive, something to note if you want to keep accommodation costs down.

Local Food you should try.

I tried two local specialties during my 2 day visit, one which is known as a Langos, this is a fried dough with various different toppings, I had sour cream and cheese on my Langos. I had this for lunch on both days, one Langos will easily feed two people and can be found in many places around the city. The second local food I tried was a Chimney cake, this is dough cooked in the shape of a chimney that can be covered in many different flavours and toppings I had cinnamon and sugar, Perfect to satisfy that sweet craving.

What should you do?

Parliament Building

This building sits proudly on the Danube river banking and looks stunning from all angles. There is a museum you can access via the staircase pictured below that explains the events of what is known as Bloody Thursday, this was a tragic event that happened here back in 1956.

Castle District

Castle District can be found on the Buda side of the city, it’s home to the famous Fisherman’s Bastion, Matthias church and the Buda Castle along with many more things to see.

Fisherman’s Bastion

Built overlooking the Danube and surrounding the Matthias Church, this landmark provides breathtaking views over to the pest side of the city. (My favourite part of Budapest). This area can be crowded as everyone fights for space to take a photo. However located up some steps which you can access for around £3, you will find an almost empty section, a perfect opportunity to get those glamorous Instagram shots.

Matthias Church

Positioned in front of the Fisherman’s bastion. This church is arguably the most unique in Europe, during the Turkish invasion it was even used as a Mosque. Tours are available that allow you access to the top of the bell tower, something I didn’t manage to do, however would like to next time.

Central Budapest

Budapest Eye

See the city from a whole new perspective via the Budapest eye, as it spins you 65 metres into the sky. This can be done day or night as it remains open until 11pm, this will cost around £9. Surrounding the eye is plenty of outdoor bars and a small park, great for those sunny days.

Basilica

Gaze up at the beautiful building as it towers over you, positioned in a square filled with several restaurants and cafes. If you are in this area and fancy a snack, check out a Donut shop called, The Box. These were honestly the best donuts I have ever eaten in my entire life.

The Citadella

Positioned at the top of Gellert hill. This area offers incredible panoramic views of the entire city. Hang around to see the sunset and watch as this spectacular city lights up the night sky.

Heroes’ Square

Just a short bus ride from the city centre, this square is situated between the Museum of Fine Arts and the Hall of Art (Kunsthalle). The square is filled with statues and monuments of Kings and Freedom fighters, plus there is a cool Budapest sign. Within just a short walk, you can discover the Vajdahunyad castle with its beautiful gardens, with a lake surrounding the castle, you can choose from several outdoor activities such as renting a paddle boat. Lastly this section of Budapest is where you will find the Zoo, takes around 3 hours to complete, a perfect activity to fill a morning or an afternoon and costs around £9.

Things I would like to do next time

As with most holidays and city breaks we usually leave saying “oh we should have done this” I certainly left Budapest thinking this. With so much to do in the Hungarian capital I’d say it’s near impossible to do everything in just a couple of days. I will be returning some time soon and this is a list of things I would like to do next time.

  • Immerse myself in the famous Baths.
  • Eat Goulash.
  • Take a ride on the Budapest eye.
  • Enjoy a calm evening cruise on the Danube river.
  • Discover the inside of the Matthias Church.
  • Revisit the Fisherman’s Bastion (I loved it that much).

If you enjoyed reading this, then please drop me a “like” or leave a “comment” and of course “follow” if you want to see more.

Travel by Season

10 FREE THINGS TO DO IN SAN FRANCISCO

1.Ina Coolbirth park

Offering incredible views of the city both during the day and night, this hidden gem can be found on Taylor street.

City view from Ina Coolbirth park. Photo taken by Rob Jackson

2. Oakland Bay Bridge

Often forgotten as Golden gate bridge draws the crowd however defiantly worth a look.

Oakland Bay Bridge. Photo taken by Rob Jackson

3. Rincorn Park

This waterfront park offers stunning views of Oakland bay bridge and has a sculpture of a giant bow and arrow, known as Cupids span.

Cupids Span. Photo taken by Rob Jackson

4. Golden Gate Bridge

Can be seen from multiple view points such as West bluff picnic area, the visitors centre and Golden Gate view point check them all out to see the bridge from different perspectives.

Golden Gate bridge. Photo taken by Rob Jackson

5. Walk along Golden Gate bridge

Walking along the Golden gate bridge offers a great experience and an opportunity to get away from the crowds.

Golden Gate bridge. Photo taken by Rob Jackson

6. Crissy field east beach

Walk along this sandy beach whilst soaking in the stunning views.

Golden Gate bridge from Crissy Field beach. Photo taken by Rob Jackson

7. Visit Lambar Street

A famously unique street surrounded by beautiful flower beds.

Lambar Street. Photo taken by Rob Jackson

8. Watch the sunset

On a clear day catch the Sunset, head to Municipal pier for the best view.

Sunset view from Municipal pier. Photo taken by Rob Jackson

9. Pier 39

This pier offers lovely scenic views of the waterfront and Alcatraz island.

Alcatraz Island. Photo taken by Rob Jackson

10. Fishermans wharf

Boasts an array of shops and restaurants this area brings in a crowd being one of the top tourist areas in San Francisco, if your lucky you might see the sea lions that often make an appearance along this waterfront.

Fishermans Wharf waterfront. Photo taken by Rob Jackson

Visit California on a Budget

Has it been your dream to visit California? Have you always thought that it was simply too expensive and put that dream aside? Perhaps you had no idea where to begin, or how to travel from one part to another?

If any of the above sounds like you, then keep on reading, as I reveal how I travelled from San Diego through Los Angeles to San Francisco in just 16 days without breaking the bank.

Within this blog I have detailed many key points that saved me money. If you would like to know exactly where I stayed, how long and what I did then just ask.

Where should you book your Flights?

Skyscanner has never let me down, I saved money by adjusting my start or end location.

If your plan was to start in San Francisco and travel south, you may save money by arriving in San Diego and travel north instead. This doesn’t always work, but if your start destination is flexible it’s certainly worth a look.

Where should you stay?

Hostels were the cheapest option for me, some Airbnb’s came close, however they rarely offer breakfast within the price. Hostels allow you to fill up on a great breakfast, whilst surrounded by likeminded people, plus you have access to leaflets and posters advising you where to eat and what to do. Don’t be put off by the cheap hostels, my favourite hostel was situated in San Diego city centre, this was in fact the cheapest hostel I have ever stayed in.

Make sure you have an idea of what you want to do and where it’s situated in relation to your accommodation. There might be accommodation that costs slightly more but allows you to walk everywhere, therefore you can justify spending a little more to save on transport costs.

How to get from one city to the next?

Greyhound bus services will get you from any major city in California to another for low prices.  I went from San Diego to Los Angeles for around $15 and from Los Angeles to San Francisco for around $24.

In my experience booking last minute wasn’t difficult, buses were regular, and they operate through the night. The journey from LA to San Francisco is almost an 8-hour journey, as my time was precious and my budget tight, I took a bus overnight.

This saved me both time and money, as I didn’t need to pay for a hostel that night and I got an extra day to see the glorious San Francisco. The buses I used were spacious and comfy, plus they had phone charging ports and WiFi. So, both me and my phone could recharge.

Transport within the city?

My experience of American public transport is fairly small, as I didn’t use it much. When in new destinations I love to walk everywhere and get a real feel for the place.

However, at times walking isn’t an option so occasionally I used apps like Uber and LYFT, both are taxi operators that often have deals if you are new to signing up. The deal I got with LYFT was 5 free rides, this got me to where I couldn’t walk. Secondly, both Uber and LYFT offer a “shared ride service”, which gets cheaper rates. Often used by locals, so that is a great opportunity to gain more knowledge of the area. Lastly, when using the apps such as Uber and LYFT, move your desired destination pinpoint around. If you place it on a tourist attraction the price may be higher than if you place it a short walk away.

How to reduce your food spending?

Another reason hostels are a win in my book is the breakfast. It usually consists of bagels with cream cheese, porridge and some fruits, if you are like me then you are in paradise. My advice here is to make the most of the breakfast, take a bagel and a piece of fruit, save it for lunch or snack later.

Hostels often have deals for dinner like cheap BBQ’s or takeaways, so definitely worth checking. When I was in LA, the hostel had free Taco’s, far from the best Taco’s but it was food after all. Another point worth noting is that hostels have cooking facilities so don’t be in the mindset that you have to eat out every night, you can save money and eat well by purchasing food and cooking it yourself. Just be prepared for the endless signs saying, “Clean up after yourself”.

I often found bar style restaurants and takeaways that offered meals such as a pizza/burger and a drink for $10. This gives you the opportunity to sit aimlessly at a bar with a beer like you see in the movies, (something I did more often than I would like to admit).

Plan your day in advance

I spent at least 30 mins each day planning my next day attempting to minimize unnecessary costs. I achieved this by organizing my whole trip, what I want to see, what is nearby, so I aimed to complete different areas of the city each day. Sounds obvious I know but I was amazed how many people would get this one wrong and would waste time and money going back to places they had been because they missed something.

Stay flexiable

Now this can be a difficult one to follow as organisation and planning is the key as I have already pointed it out. However, there are ways to be organised yet remain flexible to change. My method of flexibility was to have a couple of hostels in mind and regularly check their website. Often hostels display the number of beds remaining for each day, by keeping an eye on this it meant I could postpone booking accommodation until I had a better idea of my travel plans.

I did this whilst in San Diego and I am so glad my plans were flexible as I fell in love with the city and found there was more to do than my time allowed. Plus, many locals told me the number of days I originally planned for Los Angeles was simply too many, I took their advice and it paid off.

As I hadn’t booked my LA hostel or travel yet, I was able to postpone going there and booked 2 last minute nights in San Diego. This gave me the time I needed to visit the famous San Diego Zoo, so I’m sure you can agree me when I say, “it was worth it”.

I hope you enjoyed reading my blog, if so, please press the “like” or “follow” button below, this will help keep my page alive for other enthusiasts.
Thank you
Travel by Season

Three reasons to do a winter season

Are you looking for a change, looking for a new challenge, looking for new opportunities then keep on reading…………..

In this blog I will discuss from my experience three reasons you should hit the mountains next winter.

1. Learn a new skill

Working a winter season will for sure teach you a new skill, whether this is skiing or snowboarding as you will have plenty opportunity to catch those fresh tracks and powder days as most jobs offer great mountain time. Snow sports aside you could attempt to learn the local language. In my experience I have heard many people say to me at the start of season they will learn to speak French, very few achieved it. I even spent a season living with an ex French teacher, so like most people I thought it was a golden opportunity to learn, however even now I still class my French as very basic.

Other skills I want to touch on are what I like to call “life skills” these are skills you for sure will use in the future. It’s no lie that working a ski season no matter what your role is there will be a heavy amount of cleaning.

“That sucks” you might think, well yes it does, however, let’s face it one day you will be grateful for the hours you spent on your hands and knees scrubbing behind the toilet. Lastly cooking, yes for sure if you are based in a chalet whether working as a chef or a host you will be able to impress your friends and family once you are home by throwing together a delicious 3 course meal with canapes.

2. Opportunities

The number of opportunities a season can offer is huge, as always, I would say you get out of it what you put into it, that being said if you really impress some of your guests, they may offer you job opportunities yes that’s right! The main one for me is the networking with fellow seasonaires, quite often the people you work with may have been on all sorts of adventures, so get talking to them, ask where they have been. These conversations often happen in a bar; however, these can often be conversations that can map out then next year of your life, and help you discover an adventure you didn’t even know existed.

3. Gain Confidence

The confidence you will gain from this experience is life changing, it has certainly helped me in many ways. At the start of your season you will be faced with the possibly daunting task of meeting everyone you will be working with for the season.

I wont lie, this is kind of awkward to begin with, it quite often just consists of having the same conversation with several different people whilst eating a tasty first night dinner.
However once you have done this the first season it becomes so much easier in the future.

I earned most of my confidence from constantly meeting new people and working seasons you will meet a huge number of different people every week, in the form of your guests. You almost become an expert in having a conversation with strangers. After a couple of weeks, you tend to learn the best structure of a conversation when first meeting someone, Since I established this, I have gained so much confidence and allowed me to have more meaningful conversations with people.

After season

Season coming to an end is a sad time, having to part with not being on the mountains until next season, and saying goodbye to friends can be hard too.

However, you will be able to reflect on what an amazing season you had, you can go home, meet friends and family and tell them many stories from mad things you did on the mountains to things you can’t remember on a night out.

Most importantly you will make many personal developments, whether its mastering the mountains, cooking up a storm or cleaning in style. You will most certainly make incredible plans for the summer and gain the confidence to take on the world!


Thank you for reading and please follow me for more.

Travel by Season

Coming soon!

Thanks for joining me!

The aim of this blog is to allow you to discover the world the way I have, listed below is some of what I will cover in the near future.

  • Winter seasonal work
  • Summer seasonal work
  • City breaks
  • Traveling America

Please support me in my efforts to make people more aware of what opportunities are out there! 

Thank you 

Travel by Season

Arcadia National Park – Maine – America – Summer 2018